MS 1 Founder's Bible. Once belonged to William Smith, Bishop of Lincoln, Founder of Brasenose College. Hieronimi Biblia.
Illuminated manuscript on vellum, Paris, middle of the the thirteenth century
Written in dark brown ink with headings in red, decorative cadels in red and blue ink.
UB/S 11 97 Founder's Missal. Purchased by the college in 1893, this missal belonged to Richard Sutton, Founder of the College. Missale ad usum insignis ac preclare ecclesie Sarum. 1520.
Printed on vellum.
There are several pages of music in addition to the illuminations. The only other known copy on vellum is in the Bodleian.
UB/S III 36 De Historia Stirpium. Leonhard Fuchs.
A book on herbal plants published in Basel, 1542. Over 100 of the plants in the book were first descriptions.
Illustrated by: Albrecht Meyer, who made drawings based on the actual plants.
Heinrich Fullmaurer transferred the drawings to woodblock and Vitus Rudolf Speckle cut thye blocks and printed the drawings.
It covers 497 plants and has over 500 woodcut illustrations
Sigma A.5.84 Micrographia. Robert Hooke. 1665.
The first major publication of the Royal Society.
It was the first scientific best-seller, inspiring a wide public interest in the new science of microscopy.
It is also notable for coining the biological term cell.
Lath 4.1 Foxe's Acts and Monuments. v.1
The college has at least one copy of each edition of this work which range from the 1st edition 1563 to the 9th edition of 1694. Few places have such a collection.
The 1570 John edition Day (Lath R 4.1) is a fine example being illustrated throughout with fine woodcuts.
John Foxe studied at Brasenose, being awarded his B.A. in 1537.
Lath 4.2 Foxe's Acts and Monuments v.2
UBS III 61 Natural History of Carolina. Mark Catesby. 1731.
Catesby was the first to use folio-sized coloured plates in Natural history books
The first eight plates had no backgrounds, but from then on Catesby included plants with his animals.
He learnt how to etch the plates himself.
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