Nosedive copyNosedive is Brasenose’s diversity and equality themed magazine. We publish articles, artwork, creative writing and any other contributions produced on this theme by students of Brasenose. The magazine has so far run for three termly editions, and for the most recent I led an editorial team of five Brasenose students. Contributors are welcome to draw on personal experiences related to diversity or equality, offer opinions, highlight problems, critique artwork and media, or spotlight historical figures.

Some of our most interesting articles have identified specific barriers to equality and offered practical solutions, such as Ayo Thomas’ article on the importance of visible representation of minority ethnic groups to Oxford’s access efforts, and Peter Edmondson’s criticism of the British prison system.

I have been impressed by the wide range of skills students have at their fingertips to use in discussing equality. We have been able to publish impressive arts criticism and high quality poetry, as well as more unique works such as Georgina Brown’s two handmade hats, which explore attitudes to sexuality at specific historical moments in beautifully creative ways.

Nosedive also holds events such as poetry, collage and play-dough nights, to give students a chance to create art for the magazine in a laid back and friendly environment. Our launch nights down the bar are good fun, too. We have recently started a website, designed by first year Economics and Management student Yoojin Lee, and are in the process of uploading our pieces there so that they can have a wider reach.

I have been thrilled by the wide range of people who have taken an interest in contributing to and reading the magazine. It is wonderful to be in a college environment where people see the value in diversity and are invested in pursuing equality. The magazine and its events have been funded by college and JCR bodies.

I see Nosedive as a positive way to encourage people to think closely about issues of equality, both by refining their views to express them in the magazine, and by being introduced to other people’s perspectives and experiences.

By Isobel Smith (Second Year English student)